UK Army

FV101 Scorpion

The FV101 Scorpion is a British armored reconnaissance vehicle that is part of the Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (Tracked) (CVR(T)) family. Developed in the late 1960s and entering service in 1973 over 3,000 were produced by Alvis Vickers. The Scorpion was intended to be a fast air transportable reconnaissance vehicle and was constructed mainly from aluminum. One of the design requirements was low ground pressure with gave it excellent cross country mobility. During the Falklands War the Scorpion was one of the few vehicles capable of operating in the extreme conditions there. It also served in the Gulf War. The FV101 carried a NBC protections system, flotation screen and image intensification sights. The CRV(T) family also includes the Striker, Spartan, Samaritan, Sultan, Samson, Scimitar, Sabre and Stormer vehicles. The Scorpion carried a low velocity 76 mm L23A1 gun firing high explosive, HESH, smoke and canister rounds along with a L37A1 7.62 mm coaxial machine gun and two multi-barrel smoke grenade launchers. It left British service in 1994. The Scorpion was used by the Imperial Iranian Army, British Army, British RAF Regiment, Brunei, Belgian Army, New Zealand Army, Malaysia, Venezuela, Republic of Ireland, Jordan, Oman, Indonesia, Philippines and Chile.

FV101 Scorpion

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FV4020/4 Challenger I

The British FV4030/4 Challenger I was the main battle tank of the British Army from 1983 until it was superseded by the Challenger 2 in the 1990’s. The Challenger was built by the Royal Ordnance Factories and the design was born out of an Iranian order for an improved version of the Chieftain line of tanks. With the fall of the Shah of Iran and the collapse of the Anglo-German MBT-70 project, the British Army became the customer and further developed it. The most revolutionary aspect of the Challenger I design was its Chobham amour. This amour has been adopted by others, most notably the American M-1 Abrams. 180 Challenger tanks were deployed to Saudi Arabia for the Persian Gulf War. The Challenger I claimed 300 kills against armored vehicles for no losses. It also has the distinction of the longest tank-to-tank kill in military history, destroying an Iraqi tank at a range of 2.5 miles. The Challenger was armed with a 120 mm main gun with 44 rounds, 2 7.62 mm L7 GPMGs with 6,000 rounds and 2 5-barrel VIRSS smoke dischargers.

FV4020/4 Challenger I

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Matilda II

The British Matilda II tank (officially the Tank, Infantry, Mk II, Matilda II A12) was named after a cartoon duck. The Matilda was designed by the Royal Arsenal at Woolwich and first produced in 1937. The Matilda weighed 27 metric tons and was armed with a QF 2-pounder (40 mm) gun and a 7.92 mm BESA machinegun in a three-man turret. The armor reached a maximum of 78 mm at the front. The weight of the amour combined with the weak twin-engine power unit (adapted from a bus) and a troublesome suspension limited the speed of the tank to an average of only about 9.5 km/h. The heavy armor and relatively large gun severed the Matilda well through mid 1942 when it became outclassed be the latest German and American tanks. However the Matilda was used very effectively throughout the war in the Pacific against the Japanese making it the only British tank to serve through the entire war. There were numerous variants of the Matilda produced including flail, howitzer and flame thrower models. About 2,987 Matilda tanks were produced and about 1,000 were sent to the Soviet Union where they saw action in the Battle of Moscow and on the southern front closest to the Persian supply route. This model shows a Matilda Mark II of the 4th Royal Tank Regiment in North Africa in 1942.

Matilda II

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Mk.I Male

The Mk.1 was the first operational tank in the world and made its combat debut on September 16, 1916. It was developed from Little Willie, the experimental tank built for the Landships Committee in the summer of 1915. The tank was developed to break the lines of trenches backed by machineguns on the Western Front. It needed to be able to cross trenches, resist small arms fire, travel over difficult terrain, carry supplies and be able to capture fortified enemy positions. The development of the tank was kept secret by giving out a cover story that they were designing water tanks for the Middle East. The name Tank comes from the original false description of Tank, Water, Mesopotamia. The Mark I was a rhomboid shaped vehicle with a low center of gravity and a long track length which gave it the ability to grip muddy ground and cross trenches. Sponsons mounted on the hull sides carried the main armament. The hull was not divided into compartments so the crew had to share that same space as the engine. This turned the atmosphere inside of the tank into a poisonous mix of carbon monoxide, fuel and oil vapors and cordite fumes. Temperatures inside could reach 122 °F and entire crews lost consciousness inside the tank or became violently sick. To counter the fumes inside and the danger of bullet splash or fragments and rivets knocked off the inside of the hull, the crew wore helmets with goggles and chainmail masks. Gas masks were also standard issue. While the Mk.1 was largely immune to rifle and machinegun fire, it was vulnerable to attacks by grenades on the top of the hull. To counter this, many tanks were fitted with a mesh screen mounted on wooded supports intended to deflect grenades away from the top of the tank. Steering the Mk.1 was difficult. Four of the crew (2 drivers and 2 gearsmen) were needed to control direction and speed. In an attempt to aid steering a pair of large wheels were added behind the tank. These were not effective and were subsequently dropped. Communications with command were primitive at best and lamps, flags, semaphore and colored discs were used Carrier pigeons, which had their own small exit hatch in the sponsons, were also used. The Mk.1 came in two variations. The Male version was armed with two QF 6 pounder (57 mm) Hotchkiss naval guns in the sponsons and 4 8 mm Hotchkiss machineguns. The Female version was armed with two .303 cal. Vickers machineguns and 4 8 mm Hotchkiss machineguns. 150 Mk.1 tanks were built. One Mk.1 Male tank still survives and is the world's oldest surviving combat tank. It is part of the collection at the Bovington Tank Museum. This model shows a Mk.1 Male tank in typical mid war camouflage.

Mk.I Male

MK I Male - 007

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Mk.I Female

The Mk.1 was the first operational tank in the world and made its combat debut on September 16, 1916. It was developed from Little Willie, the experimental tank built for the Landships Committee in the summer of 1915. The tank was developed to break the lines of trenches backed by machineguns on the Western Front. It needed to be able to cross trenches, resist small arms fire, travel over difficult terrain, carry supplies and be able to capture fortified enemy positions. The development of the tank was kept secret by giving out a cover story that they were designing water tanks for the Middle East. The name Tank comes from the original false description of Tank, Water, Mesopotamia. The Mark I was a rhomboid shaped vehicle with a low center of gravity and a long track length which gave it the ability to grip muddy ground and cross trenches. Sponsons mounted on the hull sides carried the main armament. The hull was not divided into compartments so the crew had to share that same space as the engine. This turned the atmosphere inside of the tank into a poisonous mix of carbon monoxide, fuel and oil vapors and cordite fumes. Temperatures inside could reach 122 °F and entire crews lost consciousness inside the tank or became violently sick. To counter the fumes inside and the danger of bullet splash or fragments and rivets knocked off the inside of the hull, the crew wore helmets with goggles and chainmail masks. Gas masks were also standard issue. While the Mk.1 was largely immune to rifle and machinegun fire, it was vulnerable to attacks by grenades on the top of the hull. To counter this, many tanks were fitted with a mesh screen mounted on wooded supports intended to deflect grenades away from the top of the tank. Steering the Mk.1 was difficult. Four of the crew (2 drivers and 2 gearsmen) were needed to control direction and speed. In an attempt to aid steering a pair of large wheels were added behind the tank. These were not effective and were subsequently dropped. Communications with command were primitive at best and lamps, flags, semaphore and colored discs were used Carrier pigeons, which had their own small exit hatch in the sponsons, were also used. The Mk.1 came in two variations. Production was split between the Male and Female versions. The Female version was armed with four .303 cal. Vickers machineguns in the sponsons and one 8 mm Hotchkiss machinegun. The Male version was armed with two QF 6 pounder Hotchkiss naval guns in the sponsons and four 8 mm Hotchkiss machineguns. 150 Mk.1 tanks were built. One Mk.1 Male tank still survives and is the world's oldest surviving combat tank. It is part of the collection at the Bovington Tank Museum. This model shows a Mk.1 Female tank in typical later war camouflage.

Mk.I Female

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Medium Mk.A Whippet

Designed beginning in October 1916 and entering production in February 1917, the Medium Mark A Whippet was a British WWI medium tank. The initial design of the Whippet called for a turret from the Austin armored car mounting a single machine gun. Due to production problems the turret was replaced by a fixed polygonal casement at the rear of the tank that also functioned as the crew compartment. The Whippet was powered by two 45 hp bus engines, one engine per track. While driving straight ahead the two engines were locked together. Turning the steering wheel gradually closed the throttle for the engine of one track and opened the throttle for the engine driving the other. Brakes on each engine could also be used to assist in steering. Armament was four .303 cal. Hotchkiss Mk 1 machineguns in a fixed mount facing each direction. The Whippet went into action in March 1918 when they were used to cover the retreat caused by the German Spring Offensive. In April 1918 Whippets near Cachy wiped out two entire German infantry battalions caught in the open, killing over 400 and on April 24 a Whippet was destroyed by a German A7V in the world's second tank battle. They also took part in the Amiens offensive on August 8, 1918. They broke through into the German rear destroying the artillery covering the entire sector. One Whippet, Musical Box, advanced so far it was cut off behind German lines. For nine hours it roamed at will, destroying an artillery battery, an Observation balloon, the camp of an infantry battalion and a transport column of the German 225 Division. Eventually a German shell disabled it and as the crew abandoned the tank one was shot and killed and the other two were taken prisoner. After WWI Whippets were used in Ireland during the Anglo-Irish War, by the Expedition Forces in support of the Whites against Soviet Russia and by the Japanese. Five Whippets survive today. This model shows a Medium Mark A Whippet in France during August 1918.

Medium Mk.A Whippet

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Churchill Mk.I

The Tank, Infantry, Mk IV (A22) better known as the Churchill was a WWII heavy infantry tank. The original Churchill design was specified in the late 1930s. It was a typical WWI design with heavy armor, low speed and sponson mounted weapons. The first prototypes were ready in June 1940. The defeat of Poland and France changed the British expectations for tank warfare. The Churchill was completely redesigned beginning in July 1940 and the design was completed in December. The first tanks entered service in July 1941. Because of the quick design the initial versions were plagued with mechanical faults. However by the Mk.III the worst faults were corrected and the Churchill remained in production until the end of the war. It was also the basis for a whole range of vehicles including flamethrowers, AVRE engineer vehicles with a 290 mm Petard spigot mortar, armored recovery vehicles, armored ramp carriers, bridge layers, anti-mine flails and an armored personnel carrier. The Churchill was one of the heaviest Allied tanks of WWII. The last combat action of the Churchill was during the Korean War in 1950. The last bridge layer served until 1975.The Mk.I featured heavy armor, large longitudinal chassis with all-around tracks with multiple bogies. The multiple bogie suspension gave it excellent cross country mobility and it could cross obstacles that most other tanks of its era could not. The Churchill was armed with a 2 pounder gun and a 7.62 mm machinegun in the turret and a 3 inch howitzer in the hull. This model shows a Churchill Mk.I tank with the British Home Guard in 1942.

Churchill Mk.I

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[Karl's Models] [US Army] [UK Army] [Mk.I Male] [Matilda Mk.II] [FV4030/4 Challenger I] [FV101 Scorpion] [Mk.I Female] [Mk.A Whippet] [Churchill Mk.I] [Imperial German Army] [Heer] [Red Army] [Polish Army] [Civilian] [Minitanks] [New Zealand Army] [IJA] [Armée de Terre]

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