US Army Air Corps

P-6 E Hawk Fighter

The US Army Air Corps placed an order for 18 P-6s in 1929. The P-6 series of aircraft , which were developed from the P-1 series, had 13 distinct sub types and 8 different models. The best known of the series was the E model. The P-6 E had a modified fuselage, single strut landing gear with wheel fairings and a 700 hp engine with Prestone cooling. The last P-6 E's were retired from the service in 1939 and mostly donated to flying schools as non-flying training aids. The P-6 was armed with 2 .30 cal. machineguns. One P-6 survives at the Smithsonian. This model shows an aircraft from the 17th Pursuit Squadron based at Selfridge Field, Michigan. The Snow Owl engine cover markings were applied for participation in the 1932 Air Races.

P-6 E Hawk Fighter

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P-35 A Fighter

The Seversky P-35 was the first US fighter with retractable landing gear, all-metal construction and an enclosed cockpit. Based on a private venture design, the P-35 won the Army Air Corps competition in 1936 and 77 were ordered with delivery beginning in 1937. The P-35 was armed with one .30 cal and one .50 cal machinegun and had a top speed of 282 mph. The P-35 A was developed from the P-35 in an attempt to bring the plane up to the standards of other combat planes in Europe. A more powerful engine was fitted and the armament was increased to two .30 cal machineguns in the wings and two .50 cal machineguns in the cowling. The maximum speed increased to 310 mph. In spite of the upgrades to the P-35 A it was becoming obsolescent at the beginning of WWII. Sweden ordered 60 of the P-35 A, flying them until 1952. In 1941, 40 P-35 As were sent to The Philippines to support the defense of the island. During the Japanese attack on December 8, 1941 the P-35 A fought well but was totally outclassed by the Japanese Zero fighters. They were withdrawn on December 12, 1941 with only 12 survivors. Export versions of the P-35 were also flown by the Colombian Air Force, the Ecuadorian Air Force, the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service and the Soviet Air Force. One P-35 survives today at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Museum and one in the Swedish Air Force Museum. This model shows a P-35 A of the 1st Pursuit Group at Selfridge Field, Michigan in 1938.

P-35 A Fighter

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P-36 A Hawk Fighter

The P-36 Hawk was developed from the Curtiss Hawk Model 75 and was originally designed for France. The P-36 entered production for the Army Air Corps in 1938, with the first production P-36 A delivered to the 20th Pursuit Group at Barksdale Field in Louisiana in April. By 1941 the aircraft was obsolescent and most were transferred to Hawaii and Alaska. During the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 2 of the first 6 aircraft that were able to get airborne to meet the attack were P-36s. These aircraft were credited with shooting down two Japanese Nakajima B5N bombers, the first US aerial victories of World War II. Following the outbreak of hostilities, the outmoded P-36 was relegated to training and courier duties within the US. The P-36 was armed with 1 .50 caliber and 1 .30 caliber machinegun. This model shows a P-36 A painted for the Army wargames in 1939. Also see the Curtiss Hawk 75 and the P-40 B Warhawk and the P-40 E Warhawk and the Hawks group and the XP-37.

P-36 A Hawk Fighter

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A-8 Shrike Ground Attack Plane

The Curtiss A-8 Shrike was a low wing monoplane ground attack plane developed in response to a 1929 Army specification. The Shrike was very much a transitional aircraft with advanced features such as all metal construction, automatic leading edge slats and trailing edge flaps mixed with obsolescent ones such as fixed spatted landing gear and heavy wing bracing. At the time, the A-8 was considered something of a revolutionary plane for the Army. When it entered service it was the fastest plane in the inventory and the fist monoplane to fly with the Army Air Corps. A total of 13 service test aircraft were ordered and after trials were completed they were redesignated as A-8s. The liquid cooled engine proved to be problematic and a further order for 46 more Shrikes was changed to a radial engine version designated A-12. The Curtiss A-8 Shrike was armed with 4 forward firing .30 cal. M1919 Browning machineguns in the landing gear spats and 1 .30 cal. M1919 Browning machinegun on a flexible mount in the rear compartment. It could carry 10 30 lb bombs in chutes mounted in the fuselage or 4 100 lb. bombs under the wings or chemical weapon spray tanks under the wings. The A-8 had a crew of 2, a top speed of 183 mph and a range of 480 miles. This model shows a Shrike flying with 13th attack squadron in the mid 1930s.

A-8 Shrike Ground Attack Plane

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Blimp Bank

This was a just for fun project. I took a plaster bank from a mortgage company that I found in a thrift store and painted it to look something like a late 1930s blimp. The last photo shows it with a HE-70.

Blimp Bank

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P-26 A Peashooter Fighter

Begun in 1931 as a private project, with the US Army providing the engines and instruments, the model 248 first flew in 1932. The prototype had a high landing speed which necessitated adding flaps to reduce the landing speed. In spite of this it was still a tricky plane to land with a tendency to flip on it's back. This required adding a taller, armored headrest. Deliveries began in December 1933 with the 151st aircraft coming off the assembly line in 1936. The P-26 Peashooter was the first US all metal production fighter aircraft and the first pursuit monoplane used by the United States Army Air Corps. Overall, 22 different squadrons flew the P-26 and they were the USAAC front line fighter plane until 1938. Although removed from front line service the P-26 was still in use with the USAAC as late as 1941 in the Philippines. The P-26 was also exported to the Philippines, China and Guatemala. Their first combat action was in China on August 15, 1937 when eight Chinese Air Force P-26s fought eight Mitsubishi G3M Nell bombers. They shot down 2 bombers with no loses. In December 1941 there were 28 P-26s in the Philippines they claimed one G3M and two Mitsubishi A6M2 Zeros. The rest were burned on December 24, 1941. In 1942 Guatemala acquired seven P-26s. They continued to serve until the last two were retired in 1956. The B-26 was armed with either two.30 cal. M1919 Browning machineguns or one .30 cal. and one .50 cal. machineguns. It could also carry two 100 lb GP bombs or five 31 lb antipersonnel bombs. There are two original P-26 Peashooters still surviving. This model shows a P-26 Peashooter flying with the 94th Pursuit Squadron in the mid 1930s.

P-26 A Peashooter Fighter

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[Karl's Models] [British Empire] [US Navy] [US Army Air Corps] [P-36 A Hawk] [P-6 E Hawk] [P-35] [A-8 Shrike] [Blimp Bank] [P-26 A Peashooter] [Estonia]

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