USA

UH-1 B Huey Helicopter

First flying on October 20, 1956 the Bell UH-1 Iroquois (better known as the Huey) was the first turbine powered helicopter to enter US service. In March 1960 the Army awarded Bell a production contract for 100 aircraft designated HU-1A. The nickname Huey came from the helicopters original HU-1 designation. In September 1962 the designation was changed to UH-1 but the nickname stuck. The UH-1A first entered service with the 101st Airborne Division, the 82nd Airborne Division and the 57th Medical Detachment. Although intended for evaluation only the Army quickly pressed the helicopter into operational service and Hueys with the 57th Medical Detachment arrived in Vietnam in March 1962. While the UH-1 was a big advance over the earlier piston engined helicopters, the Army wanted better performance. The UH-1 B featured a more powerful Lycoming engine and a longer cabin that could accommodate seven passengers or four stretchers and a medical attendant. The First UH-1 B was delivered in March 1961. The first combat missions of the UH-1 were during the Vietnam War. During the 1960s the Huey became one of the iconic symbols of the Vietnam War and became the world's most recognized helicopter. In Vietnam the Hueys main missions were general support, air assault, cargo transport, Aeromedical evacuation, search and rescue, electronic warfare and ground attack. Even though many pilots preferred the UH-1 gunship because of its ability to act as a dustoff plane if needed and better view out of the larger Huey cockpit (which allowed return fire from door gunners to the rear and sides of the aircraft) the increasing intensity of NVA anti aircraft defenses forced their replacement by the AH-1 Cobra helicopter from during 1967 to late 1968. During the war 7,013 UH-1s served in Vietnam and 3,305 were destroyed. Although the Army phased out the UH-1 with the introduction of the UH-60 Black Hawk, the Army Residual Fleet has around 700 UH-1s that are to be retained until 2015. The Huey has been continually upgraded over the years and remains in production today with at least 75 countries having flown the Huey. This model shows a UH-1 B Huey flying with US Army Aviation at Vo Dat, Vietnam in 1965. The UH-1 B was armed with a huge variety of weapons over the years. This model shows a UH-1 B armed with the XM-3/M-3 Armament Subsystem mounted on a M-156 Helicopter Multi-armament Mount. The M-3 carried 48 tube launched 2.75 inch FFARs. It also carries the M-5 Armament Subsystem. The M-5 was a belt fed M-75 40 mm grenade launcher in a flexible chin mounted turret with a capacity of 150 to 300 rounds.

UH-1 B Huey Helicopter

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AH-1 G Huey Cobra

The AH-1 Huey Cobra was designed in response to an Army requirement for an interim fast armed escort helicopter. The AH-1 Cobra was developed from the UH-1 Huey and used the same transmission, rotor system and engine. The Cobra entered service in June 1967 with the designation UH-1 H, it was then changed to AH-1 H but since the improved UH-1D became the UH-1H, it was changed to AH-1G. One of the most distinctive features of the Cobra is it's 38 inch wide airframe which presents a much more difficult target compared to other helicopters. By the time of the 1968 Tet offensive the Cobra was in full service and was used extensively throughout the Vietnam War. Cobras provided fire support, escorted transport helicopters, became aerial rocket artillery battalions in airmobile divisions and formed hunter killer teams to ferret out hidden enemy positions. About 1,116 AH-1Gs were used in the Vietnam War and flew over a million hours. About 300 were lost to combat and accidents during the war. The Cobra served in Operation Urgent Fury, Operation Just Cause, Operation Desert Shield, Operation Desert Storm, Operation Restore Hope and the US invasion of Haiti. The Army phased out the AH-1 during the 1990s and retired the AH-1 from active service in March 1999. The Army retired the AH-1 from the reserves in September 2001. The AH-1 G Cobra could carry 2.75 inch Folding Fin Aerial Rockets in 7-tube or 19-tube rocket launchers, M-134 miniguns, M-195 20mm cannons or the XM-118 smoke grenade dispenser. It carried a chin turret that could mount a combination two M-134 7.62mm miniguns or 2 M-129 40mm automatic grenade launchers. This model shows an AH-1 G Huey Cobra with the Second Cavalry in Vietnam during 1968.

AH-1 G Huey Cobra

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PGM-11 Redstone SRBM

The PGM-11 Redstone was a direct descendant of the WWII V-2 rocket. It was developed at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama by a team headed by Werner von Braun. The first Redstone lifted off from LC-4A at Cape Canaveral on August 20, 1953. After flying a short time it suffered an engine failure and crashed. Testing and improvements continued until early 1955 and by mid 1955 the Redstone entered service. The Redstone was a short range surface-to-surface ballistic missile used by the US Army. It was the first large US ballistic missile and was in active service from June 1958 to June 1964 in West Germany. It was also the first US missile to carry a live nuclear warhead. During the 1958 Hardtack Teak high altitude weapons test a Redstone missile carried a 3.8 megaton warhead to an altitude of about 47 miles. The detonation caused widespread disruption if radio communications and was visible in Hawaii 900 miles away. Surplus Redstones were converted to civilian use where they became the basis of the Redstone family of rockets including sounding rockets and expendable launch vehicles. The Redstone was the basis for the Mercury-Redstone Launch Vehicle that carried Alan Sheppard into space for the first US manned space mission. It was also the basis of the Jupiter-A, Jupiter-C, Juno I, Saturn I, Saturn IB and Australia's Sparta satellite launcher. The PGM-11 Redstone had a range of about 75 miles and carried a W-39 3.8 megaton thermonuclear warhead. This model shows a Redstone missile in West Germany during the late 1950s.

PGM-11 Redstone SRBM

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